Hacked Without a Trace: The Threat of Fileless Malware

Finger Pointing to Malware Virus

Understanding Fileless Attacks

Malware. The word alone makes us all cringe as we instantly relate it to something malicious happening on our computers or devices. Gone are the days when we thought the easiest way to protect our computers was to install the latest anti-everything. But today’s hackers no longer depend on victims downloading an infected file – they are now leveraging fileless malware. Continue reading

Staples Investigates Potential Breach in the Northeast

Update: 9:00 a.m. ET: On December 19, Staples, Inc. released a statement outlining their findings regarding a data breach at 115 of their retail locations.

Upon the investigation, Staples confirmed initial suspicions that hackers accessed customer payment card information from their point-of-sale systems using malware.

Approximately 1.16 million payment cards were exposed in the breach. Leaked card information includes cardholder names, payment card numbers, expiration dates and card verification codes.

The attack occurred between August 10, 2014 and September 16, 2014 at 113 of their stores. Two of their stores had malware on their systems starting on July 20. The company has released a list of impacted locations along with dates of exposure.

Staples will offer free identity protection services, including credit monitoring, identity theft insurance and a free credit report to potentially impacted customers. Concerned customers may sign up for these services here. Continue reading

E-Government Breach Causes SingPass Users Concern

singpass 2Singapore’s recently implemented e-government portal, SingPass, has sparked concern for the country’s citizens and their data security. The government announced in June 2014 that the SingPass servers were breached, compromising three of the 1,560 users potentially affected.

However, the minister for communication and information Yaacob Ibrahim claims that SingPass, despite the breach, is not vulnerable to other breaches in the future. He believes that the breach could have been a result of a malware infiltration or weak passwords created by the users individually. Continue reading