Dark Web Deals: Your Child’s Identity for Sale

Young boy looking at computer screen

Did you know a child’s identity is twice as likely to be compromised as an adult’s? More than 1 million children under the age of 18 in the U.S. were identity theft victims in a single year, according to the most recent study on Child Identity Fraud by Javelin Strategy & Research. Two-thirds of those young victims are under the age of eight. Cyber thieves seek out the untapped identities of children to open credit cards, commit tax fraud, qualify for government benefits, or apply for work or a place to live – and by doing so, this compromise of personal information can go undetected for years, at least until your child has a need to open a credit card account or apply for a loan. Continue reading

New Year’s Resolution: Protect Your Family’s Digital Footprint

Young Children On Devices

Fostering a Familial Digital Resilience

Our constant internet usage empowers cybercriminals to formulate countless methods for hijacking our personal information and then use it to commit identity theft and fraud. And, although different generations within a household may have different priorities online, all generations within the family are vulnerable.

The start of a New Year is a great time to emphasize the importance of safe online behavior for all those you care for and care about. Let’s review some safe practices that provide increased protection for keeping personal information secure. Continue reading

“Sharenting” – Parents & Online Sharing: Infographic

Parents, Kids, and Online Sharing  

Sharenting, or the act of parents sharing information about their children online, is a phenomenon that began in the early 2000s. Parents began posting media of their children playing sports, taking their first steps, singing in the car and more. While social media is a great tool to keep in touch with long distance relatives and friends, some have shown concern about sharenting because of how much information of their child is online. 

Some parents believe that sharenting helps during the parenting process, whereas others say that parents sometimes share too much. With identity crimes that target children in mind, where is the line drawn when it comes to the privacy of a child’s information?

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Where Do You Stand on “Sharenting” ?

PRO V. CON: Sharenting 

The sharenting trend calls into question where the line is drawn between a parent’s right to share and a child’s right to privacy. Whether you’re posting a video of your child’s first steps, commenting on a “Tips for New Parents” article, sharing your teenager’s sweet 16 birthday photos, or writing a status about your child’s recently broken leg, social media has allowed parents to easily share the ins and outs of their family’s life online. The Wall Street Journal reports that parents will share almost 1,000 photos of their child before he or she is four years old.

Sharenting, or the act of parents sharing their children’s photos or information online, continues to be a hot topic in the social media world. How much sharing is too much? While social media has allowed families who live far away from each other to stay connected and has offered support to parents at any stage, criminals have also found ways to take advantage of the plethora of personal information available on these platforms.  Continue reading