Equifax Update: Breach Exposed More Than Reported

What Happened?

If you thought you had heard the last of Equifax, think again. Recent reports confirm that the company’s 2017 data breach exposed more information than initially reported. 

In September 2017, Equifax confirmed a data breach that affected 145.5 million U.S. consumers. The company initially reported that Social Security numbers, birth dates, driver’s license numbers and addresses were exposed in the breach. 

But a document recently submitted to the U.S Senate Banking Committee tells a different tale. According to the document, additional information like taxpayer identification numbers, email addresses and driver’s license issue dates and states was also compromised.  Continue reading

Synthetic IDs: Great For Fraudsters, Bad For Victims

Identity theft… without your full identity 

It’s called synthetic identity theft. Whether by a phishing scam, data breach, hack or physical theft, your information becomes compromised and falls into the wrong hands. Criminals use this stolen information to mix and match names, birthdays, Social Security numbers and addresses with other fabricated information to create synthetic IDs. Once the synthetic identity is made, criminals can make fraudulent charges to your bank account, open new lines of credit, order prescriptions and even commit crimes under your name. 

In 2014, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) called synthetic identity theft “the fastest growing type of identity fraud in the United States.” Unlike “true name” identity theft, fraudsters only need to use certain pieces of your information — paired with the criminal’s own or fabricated information — to create a new, “synthetic” identity.

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American JobLink Alliance Breach Affects 4.8 Million

April Breach:Scam CalloutWhat happened? 

American JobLink Alliance (AJLA), a web-based system that connects jobseekers to employers across the United States, recently reported a data breach affecting an estimated 4.8 million individuals.

The breach, caused by a hack, left jobseekers’ names, Social Security numbers and birthdates exposed. Hackers gained access into the company’s system by creating an account with the company, then exploited a vulnerability in the online application’s code.

The breach’s nationwide impact affected victims in ten different states.

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