Pro V. Con: BYOD Security Challenges & Concerns

Employees and Personal Devices 

Most employees will bring at least one type of smart device – most likely a smartphone – into the office. In fact, 77 percent of Americans use smartphones, which is why business owners have begun putting Bring Your Own Device, or “BYOD” policies in place.  

BYOD simply means that your business allows employees to bring their personal devices, like laptops and mobile devices, into the workplace. These policies vary depending on your business type, the type of information you store, your employees’ access to that sensitive information and your company’s size and budget. 

No matter what type of business you run, it’s important to consider your company’s BYOD security challenges despite the added benefits to productivity and your bottom line. Join us as we discuss BYOD, how to choose the right program for your business, and ways to improve existing BYOD programs you already have in place.  Continue reading

Test Your Data Breach IQ!

2017 Data Breach IQ Quiz 

Personal information is now more valuable than ever. In 2016, there were a total of 1,096 data breaches that affected companies across a variety of industries. Retailers, businesses, government agencies, media companies, non-profits and more had information compromised by unintended exposure or data theft. 

Criminals use the exposed information to commit identity crimes like fraud and identity theft. Understanding how data breaches work and how they impact us daily can help you secure your information more efficiently should your information ever be at risk.

 

Take this quiz to see how much you know about data breaches!

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Educational Institutions “Schooled” By Data Breaches

Educational Institutions Take on Data Breaches 

In 2016, 9 percent of all data breaches came from the education sector. While hackers may not be interested in snooping through your old grades, they’re looking for any personal information the institution has on file to commit any number of identity crimes.

Educational institutions are targeted because they hold large amounts of sensitive information. Once criminals gain access into an institution’s network, they capture your personal information from admissions applications, third-party online homework apps, campus Wi-Fi networks and more. An education data breach can also reach far and wide, affecting faculty, students and alumni alike. Continue reading