Credit 101: Bureaus, Reports & ID Theft

Credit Is More Than Your Card 

When your information is exposed in a data breach, it can cause panic and concern. Who can I trust? What should I do? And who has access to my information?  

The good news is that some of the most effective preventative measures are already within your reach. Your credit information – paired with the right credit protection tools – can help defend against fraud and identity theft after a data breach event.  

Industry experts (including those of us at EZShield, too) often suggest that consumers check their credit reports, consider placing credit freezes or fraud alerts, and contact the three major credit bureaus.  

Each of us understands the concept of credit from our own perspectives. Credit typically means “buy now, pay off later.” Credit scores indicate our lending risk and credit reports are often reviewed to rent an apartment, apply for a loan or open new credit card accounts.

So, let’s look at how credit works, how your credit reports can help you spot identity crime, and additional tools you can use to further protect your credit information.   Continue reading

Business ID Theft (Part 1): SMBs Have Identities Too

Business Identity Theft 101 

Identity theft comes in all shapes and sizes. Despite the effort we put into protecting our financial accounts, Social Security numbers and online login credentials, we’ve seen identity crimes continue to grow.

We know it’s important to protect our personal identities. But when was the last time you thought about protecting your small business’ identity?

Like people, businesses can also fall victim to identity theft. Criminals take on a business’ identity to target its funds, file fraudulent tax returns, take out loans, apply for lines of credit and accumulate debt under the company’s name. Continue reading

What Happens To Your Information After a Data Breach?

Data breaches have become all-too-common amongst retailers, businesses, educational institutions and health care facilities. Last year, 1,093 data breaches led to over 36 million compromised records in the United States, leaving millions of Americans’ personal information exposed. 

The best way you can protect your information from compromise is by taking proactive measures to safeguard it, especially after a data breach. Follow us as we break down what can happen to your information after a data breach, what the law says about notifying you of breached data and how to secure information that has already been compromised.  Continue reading