Why Are Fraudsters Targeting College Students?

As summer starts winding down, there is uncertainty what “back to school” will look like this fall in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. The news is continuously developing around whether students will be back in the classrooms, participating online, or doing a hybrid of the two. Either way, students will get back to learning, and as young adults go off to college it may open more than their minds to new ideas and doors to new opportunities; college may also open their eyes to issues often overlooked: experiencing identity theft and fraud. The 20 to 29 age group is most affected by identity theft, representing 33 percent of victims according to a 2019 Federal Trade Commission report.

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Risk of Identity Theft is a Costly Proposition for SMBs

Small Business Owner Looking at Laptop

*Originally posted June 18, 2019. Updated June 22, 2020.*

Much like individuals, businesses can be victims of identity theft. However, unlike personal identity theft, it is often unclear how a Small and Medium-Sized Business (SMB) can recover from the financial and reputational impact. Business identity theft occurs when criminals impersonate a company to target its funds, file fraudulent tax returns, take out loans, or apply for lines of credit — all for financial gain. Continue reading

Coronavirus Scams Targeting Your Social Security Number

elderly man using laptop to check social security information

April is National Social Security Awareness month, and a good time to get up to speed on the latest scams targeting your Social Security number (SSN) and the resulting fraud that occurs. In 2019, government imposter scams were at an all-time high, with the majority of imposters pretending to be from the Social Security Administration (SSA). The new twist in 2020 comes as scammers capitalize on the coronavirus outbreak and the ongoing media coverage of COVID-19 and its impact on society and the economy.

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500K Zoom Accounts Discovered for Sale on the Dark Web

online video conference

What Happened?

As organizations move to remote work during the COVID-19 crisis, online communications have become essential. Online audio, web and video conferencing tool usage have increased 400% in only one month, according to AT&T. This new popularity for virtual meetings has also seen a multitude of security exploitations on popular video conferencing sites like Zoom.

On April 14, 2020, over 500,000 Zoom account credentials were found for sale on the Dark Web. The information available for purchase include the user’s email address, password, personal meeting URL, and their Zoom Host Key — all being sold for less than a penny each. In some cases, the account credentials were being offered for free. The account details were obtained through credential stuffing attacks, where cyberthieves use emails and passwords previously exposed in other, non-related data breaches, to attempt access into other sites.

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