Are You at Risk for Unemployment Identity Theft?

unemployment fraud

Wherever there are funds that can be stolen, identity thieves are likely to be at work. It turns out that unemployment benefits are no exception.

Unemployment scams have become more lucrative during COVID-19, as states have experienced overwhelming benefits claims from millions of first-time filers. There is a priority for states to get that money out quickly, even more so during a pandemic, so they don’t wait for an employer to verify the identity of the person who’s applied for benefits online. Continue reading

Credit 101: Bureaus, Reports & ID Theft

Credit Score on Mobile Phone

Credit Is More Than Your Card 

When your information is exposed in a data breach, it can cause panic and concern. Who can I trust? What should I do? And who has access to my information?  

The good news is that some of the most effective preventative measures are already within your reach. Your credit information – paired with the right credit protection tools – can help defend against fraud and identity theft after a data breach event.  

Each of us understands the concept of credit from our own perspectives. Credit typically means “buy now, pay off later.” Credit scores indicate our lending risk and credit reports are often reviewed to rent an apartment, apply for a loan or open new credit card accounts.

Industry experts (including those of us at Sontiq, too) often suggest that consumers check their credit reports, consider placing credit freezes or fraud alerts, and contact the three major credit bureaus. So, let’s look at how credit works, how your credit reports can help you spot identity crime and additional tools you can use to further protect your credit information.   Continue reading

Criminal Identity Theft – Are You at Risk?

Go to Jail Gameboard

In the movie “Identity Thief,” Melissa McCarthy plays Diana, a woman who steals the identity of a man named Sandy, played by Jason Bateman. While using his credit card to buy drinks for a bar full of patrons, Diana tangles with the bartender and ends up getting arrested, giving Sandy’s name as her own. When the real Sandy tries to use his credit card to buy gas the next day, the clerk cuts up his declined card. Worse yet, Sandy finds out he missed “his” court date for assault charges. This is criminal identity theft as a fictional extreme.

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